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5 gaming devices to buy

5 gaming devices to buy

Asus ROG Strix Scar 16

Everyone's a gamer. It doesn't matter if you're playing a mobile game, an indie game, or a big-budget AAA game. They all count. Which explains why the games industry is huge with a projected revenue of US$282 billion this year. That's larger than both the movies and music industries, by the way. And there are so many ways to get your game fix. Nowadays, gaming devices can be anything from your Xbox/PlayStation/Nintendo consoles to smartphones to all kinds of PCs (laptops, desktops, 2-in-1 convertibles). There are even retro gaming consoles for those looking for that nostalgia hit. Here are five ways of playing video games — in the form of these five different gaming devices.

Lenovo Legion Go

Lenovo Legion Go
Credit: Vincent Chang/Can Buy or Not

Handheld gaming consoles that run PC games are among the hottest gaming devices in recent years. Valve's Steam Deck kickstarted it, and companies like Asus, Lenovo, and MSI, have since rushed into this space with their own versions. My favourite among these gaming devices is the Lenovo Legion Go, which offers a larger 8.8-inch screen than most of its rivals, a kickstand, and a pair of detachable controllers. Performance and battery life are decent, too.

Asus ROG Phone 8 Pro Edition

Asus ROG Phone 8 Pro
Credit: Vincent Chang/Can Buy or Not

Gaming smartphones may be a dying breed, but there are real benefits to using one if you're serious about mobile games. The Asus ROG Phone 8 Pro Edition, for example, have touch-sensitive buttons at the edge that work like the shoulder triggers on console controllers. It also has a fan accessory to cool the phone during long gaming sessions. So your smartphone or tablet may be just as capable at running a mobile game, but for the ultimate mobile gaming experience, it's hard to beat a gaming phone.

Aftershock Lunar 14 (AMD)

Aftershock Lunar 14 (AMD)
Credit: Vincent Chang/Can Buy or Not

A portable laptop that can run modern games is no longer the pipe dream it used to be. Ultrabooks now pack processors with integrated graphics that are just about fast enough to run even AAA games, albeit with more modest settings and at lower resolutions. Take the Aftershock Lunar 14 (AMD), for example. This 1.4kg notebook can run a AAA game like Watch Dogs: Legion at 38fps at Medium setting and 1080p. Not 60fps smooth, but it's playable. A great option for those who want something lightweight for work and play.

Asus ROG Strix Scar 16

Asus ROG Strix Scar 16
Credit: Vincent Chang/Can Buy or Not

If you're looking to splurge on a powerful but still portable (technically) gaming machine, a high-end gaming notebook like the Asus ROG Strix Scar 16 fits the bill. It's packed with the latest gaming hardware, and runs cooler than I expected. The screen is large and lovely — with a fast 240Hz refresh rate that should satisfy most gamers, and Dolby Vision support for when you prefer to watch movies instead.

See Also
Dell Premier Collaboration KB and Mouse

Acer Predator Orion X

Acer Predator Orion X
Credit: Vincent Chang/Can Buy or Not

Nothing beats a desktop PC for performance or value. Of course, a pre-made system like the Acer Predator Orion X costs significantly more than a DIY one. But I was so impressed by the clever compact design of this Acer small form factor PC that I can overlook the price premium. It's small but powerful, and still has room for users to upgrade with newer components in the future.


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